The thickness of the armored deck ranged from 35–40 millimeters (1.4–1.6 in) on the flat and 60 millimeters (2.4 in) on the slope. This gave the ship a total of forty-eight 25 mm guns in 16 triple mounts. [20] After her launch, the construction of Ibuki was suspended in July 1943 while her fate was discussed. [9] Two twin 13.2 mm Type 93 machine gun mounts were supposed to be mounted on the bridge with 2,000 rounds per gun. [11] The Type 93 torpedo, fueled by compressed oxygen and widely referred to in post-war literature as the "Long Lance", had three range/speed settings. Work continued until 16 March 1945, but it was ordered to halt when she was 80% complete to concentrate on the construction of small submarines needed to defend Japan against an American invasion. Ibuki was scrapped at Sasebo from 22 November 1946 to 1 August 1947. Their waterline armoured belt extended all the way down to the double bottom. It had a range of 20,000 meters (22,000 yd) at a speed of 48 knots (89 km/h; 55 mph), 32,000 meters (35,000 yd) at 40 knots (74 km/h; 46 mph), or 40,000 meters (44,000 yd) at a speed of 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph). A Type 93 passive hydrophone system would have been fitted in the bow. Work on the conversion did not begin until the incomplete hull was towed to Sasebo on 21 December. 301 was ordered scrapped less than a month after she was laid down in order to clear her slipway for the carrier Amagi which was laid down on 1 October 1942. 300 and No. The maximum effective rate of fire was only between 110 and 120 rounds per minute due to the frequent need to change the fifteen-round magazines. Quick-reloading gear was installed for every mount that allowed the reserve torpedoes to be loaded in three to five minutes in ideal conditions. The Ibuki-class (伊吹型, Ibuki-gata?) The Ibuki-class (伊吹型, Ibuki-gata) cruisers were the last class of heavy cruisers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN). Before the ship was completed, she was ordered to be converted into a light aircraft carrier that could carry 27 aircraft. The 25 mm guns would have been controlled by two Type 95 directors mounted on the bridge. Construction resumed a month later to allow the ship to be launched and clear her slipway for carrier construction. [15], The ships' armor scheme was only slightly modified from the Mogami-class cruisers. The first two forward turrets were on the same level, but the third turret could superfire over the first two. [1], The ships had a length of 200.6 meters (658 ft 2 in) overall. [6] The secondary armament was to consist of eight 40-caliber 12.7 cm Type 89 anti-aircraft (AA) guns in twin mounts. [4], The deck above the steering gear and rudders was 30 millimeters (1.2 in) thick. A pair of Type 94 high-angle directors, one on each side of the bridge, were intended to control the Type 89 guns. Under the extremely tense situation, the Japanese government sends Aircraft Carrier Ibuki and an escort fleet to the area. The 25 mm guns would have been controlled by two Type 95 directors mounted on the bridge. The ships would have carried a total of 122 powder charges for the catapults as well as four 250-kilogram (550 lb) bombs for the aircraft. They had a beam of 20.2 meters (66 ft 3 in) and a draft of 6.04 meters (19 ft 10 in). The unnamed second ship was scrapped less than a month after being laid down in order to clear her slipway for an aircraft carrier. They cost 60,000,000 yen each and had a crew of 54 officers and 822 enlisted men. The ammunition hoists for the secondary armament were protected by 75 to 100 millimeters (3.0 to 3.9 in) of armor. Sitefriends. [11], Ibuki's two aft turbine sets, the four aft boilers and the two innermost propeller shafts were removed with their propellers; the exhaust uptakes for the remaining boilers were trunked together into a downward-curving funnel on the starboard side of the hull. A Type 93 passive hydrophone system would have been fitted in the bow. The magazines were protected by fore and aft transverse bulkheads 95–140 millimeters (3.7–5.5 in) thick. [4], The deck above the steering gear and rudders was 30 millimeters (1.2 in) thick. and Japan faces one day which they never have before. Each director was fitted with a 4.5-meter (14 ft 9 in) rangefinder. [3], The thickness of the armored deck ranged from 35–40 millimeters (1.4–1.6 in) on the flat and 60 millimeters (2.4 in) on the slope. Ibuki was scrapped in Sasebo Naval Arsenal Drydock No. Two of these were to be installed in turrets Nos. They cost 60,000,000 yen each and had a crew of 54 officers and 822 enlisted men. Their waterline armoured belt extended all the way down to the double bottom. They would have been launched by a pair of aircraft catapults, one on each side of the aircraft platform. Post anonymous comment : Anonymous comments have a moderation delay and show up after 15 minutes Add comment . The Ibuki-class (伊吹型, Ibuki-gata?) [2], They were fitted with four Kampon geared steam turbine sets with a total of 152,000 shaft horsepower (113,000 kW), each driving a 3.9-meter (13 ft) propeller. Over the machinery spaces, it was 100 millimeters (3.9 in) thick at the top and tapered to 30 millimeters (1.2 in) at the bottom. While plans were prepared for the conversion, she was towed to the Sasebo Naval Arsenal, Sasebo, by the submarine tender Jingei 19–21 December. Both ships were laid down without names, just as Warships No. In order to save design time, the ships were essentially repeats of the earlier Mogami class. They displaced 12,220 metric tons (12,030 long tons) at standard load and 14,828 metric tons (14,594 long tons) at (full load). The space made available was used for avgas tanks (133 metric tons (131 long tons) in capacity), additional fuel oil tanks, as well as bomb and torpedo magazines that had a capacity of 24 bombs and two torpedoes. They displaced 12,220 metric tons (12,030 long tons) at standard load and 14,828 metric tons (14,594 long tons) at (full load). Steam was provided by eight Kampon Ro Gō-type three-drum water-tube boilers that operated at a pressure of 22 kg/cm2 (2,157 kPa; 313 psi) and temperature of 300 °C (572 °F). Articles containing Japanese-language text, Articles incorporating text from Wikipedia, Aircraft carriers of the Imperial Japanese Navy, Rapid Naval Armaments Supplement Programme, https://www.worldcat.org/title/japanese-cruisers-of-the-pacific-war/oclc/21079856/viewport, Japanese naval ship classes of World War II, https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Ibuki-class_cruiser?oldid=4524828, Pages using duplicate arguments in template calls, 6,300 nmi (11,700 km; 7,200 mi) at 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph), Converted to a light aircraft carrier, December 1943.

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